Heavy Rainfall Expected in Peel Region Due to Remnants of Hurricane Beryl

Peel region is expected to face "hazards" over the next few days, with torrential downpours possibly bringing rainfall rates of up to 40 millimetres per hour.

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The National Weather Agency has issued a special weather statement for Mississauga, Brampton, and Caledon, cautioning residents about potential heavy rainfall from Tuesday to Thursday (July 9-11). This forecast follows the remnants of Hurricane Beryl, which has already impacted the Caribbean, Mexico, and the southern United States.

Peel region is expected to face “hazards” over the next few days, with torrential downpours possibly bringing rainfall rates of up to 40 millimetres per hour. Localized rainfall totals could exceed 50 millimetres, according to the statement.

“Confidence in the track of the weather system and associated rainfall amounts is low at this point,” the agency stated for Peel residents. “Heavy rainfall associated with the remnants of hurricane Beryl may affect portions of southern Ontario, beginning Tuesday night or Wednesday, and may persist into Thursday.”

Historically, these weather systems have brought high rainfall rates, noted Environment Canada. As confidence in the storm’s path increases, “rainfall warnings may be issued,” the statement added.

This advisory comes amid an ongoing heat warning for Peel region, which is expected to last until Tuesday.

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The Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) is advising Peel drivers to be cautious on the roads during this period of volatile weather. The organization warns that the warm weather, which will persist for the next few months, creates prime conditions for road accidents.

“The weather’s absolutely perfect. The road is dry as a bone. Life is good … so you step on the gas a bit too hard,” the CAA cautioned.

Transport Canada reports that two out of three fatal collisions on Canadian roads occur under such seemingly ideal conditions.

“Moreover, summertime can also mean a sudden downpour, a fog bank appearing out of nowhere, or the blinding glare of the sun on your windshield. In short, the risk of disaster is always there during the warm season,” the CAA added.

Residents are encouraged to stay updated with the latest weather forecasts and to exercise caution, both on the road and in preparation for potential heavy rainfall.

NEWS

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